Item:
ONSV10235

In stock

Original U.S. WWII Martin B-26B Marauder Recognition Model Airplane by Cruver

Regular price $275.00

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Item Description

Original Item: Only One Available. During World War Two there was a mass of teaching materials used by the armed forces to train gunners and aircrew in the identification of aircraft, ships and ground vehicles. The ability of servicemen to identify "friend or foe" in an instant was crucial to combat survival and the subject of recognition was taught in just about every World War II service school. These “recognition models” (also known as “ID” or “spotter” models) were seen as critical to the war effort. Some were detailed for use in educational films or for marking identification, but many were simply painted black to simulate a silhouette. These helped familiarize observers with the outlines of planes from all possible angles. Trained spotters were important to the war effort and to aid them 1:72 scale plastic models were made. The manufacturers Cruver and Design Center for airplane models are well known as being the primary providers of almost all production models in plastic.

Cruver produced this beautiful, original (cellulose acetate) U.S. WWII Martin B-26B Marauder it is offered in very good condition with no distortion or deterioration. Underbody designation reads:

US  B-26B-1
MAT '42
Cruver Circle C logo


This model has a wingspan is 11.5" and fuselage length 10" and is offered in excellent condition.

The Martin B-26 Marauder is an American twin-engined medium bomber that saw extensive service during World War II. The B-26 was built at two locations: Baltimore, Maryland, and Omaha, Nebraska, by the Glenn L. Martin Company.

First used in the Pacific Theater of World War II in early 1942, it was also used in the Mediterranean Theater and in Western Europe.

After entering service with the United States Army aviation units, the aircraft quickly received the reputation of a "widowmaker" due to the early models' high accident rate during takeoffs and landings. This was because the Marauder had to be flown at precise airspeeds, particularly on final runway approach or when one engine was out. The unusually high 150 mph (241 km/h) speed on short final runway approach was intimidating to many pilots who were used to much slower approach speeds, and whenever they slowed to speeds below those stipulated in the manual, the aircraft would often stall and crash.

The B-26 became a safer aircraft once crews were re-trained, and after aerodynamics modifications (an increase of wingspan and wing angle-of-incidence to give better takeoff performance, and a larger vertical stabilizer and rudder). The Marauder ended World War II with the lowest loss rate of any USAAF bomber.

A total of 5,288 were produced between February 1941 and March 1945; 522 of these were flown by the Royal Air Force and the South African Air Force. By the time the United States Air Force was created as an independent military service separate from the United States Army in 1947, all Martin B-26s had been retired from U.S. service. After the Marauder was retired the unrelated Douglas A-26 Invader then assumed the "B-26" designation which led to confusion between the two aircraft.
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