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Item:
ON3652

Original U.S. WWII Boeing Stearman Biplane Wing Star

Regular price $995.00

Item Description

Original item: Only One Available. This is an original fabric section cut from the wing of a WW2 Sterman biplane that was used to train pilots during WW2.

The Stearman (Boeing) is a biplane used as a military trainer aircraft, of which at least 10,626 were built in the United States during the 1930s and 1940s. Stearman Aircraft became a subsidiary of Boeing in 1934. Widely known as the Stearman, Boeing Stearman or Kaydet, it served as a primary trainer for the United States Army Air Forces, the United States Navy (as the NS & N2S), and with the Royal Canadian Air Force as the Kaydet throughout World War II. After the conflict was over, thousands of surplus aircraft were sold on the civilian market. In the immediate postwar years they became popular as crop dusters, sports planes, and for aerobatic and wing walking use in air shows.

The Stearman was usually the first airplane a pilot would fly when becoming a U.S. Naval Aviator or Army Air Corps Cadet. The simple steel tube fuselage and wood and fabric wings made the aircraft a durable trainer, capable of taking lots of abuse future Aces and washouts alike.

Even though the US Army Air Corps needed a new biplane trainer in the mid-1930’s, it moved slowly to acquire one because of the service-wide lack of funding for new airplane purchases. In 1936, following the Navy’s lead the previous year, the Army tentatively bought 26 airframes from Boeing (the Model 75), which the Army named the PT-13. With war on the horizon, this trickle of acquisition soon turned into a torrent; 3519 were delivered in 1940 alone.

Built as a private venture by the Stearman Aircraft Company of Wichita (bought by Boeing in 1934), this two-seat biplane was of mixed construction. The wings were of wood with fabric covering while the fuselage had a tough, welded steel framework, also fabric covered. Either a Lycoming R-680 (PT-13) or Continental R-670 (PT-17) engine powered most models, at a top speed of 124 mph with a 505-mile range. An engine shortage in 1940-41 led to the installation of 225-hp Jacobs R-755 engines on some 150 airframes, and the new designation PT-18.

The US Navy's early aircraft, designated NS-1, eventually evolved into the N2S series, and the Royal Canadian Air Force called their Lend-Lease aircraft PT-27s. (The Canadians were also responsible for the moniker "Kaydet," a name eventually adopted by air forces around the globe).

The plane was easy to fly, and relatively forgiving of new pilots. It gained a reputation as a rugged airplane and a good teacher. Officially named the Boeing Model 75, the plane was (and still is) persistently known as the "Stearman" by many who flew them. It was called the "PT" by the Army, "N2S" by the Navy and "Kaydet" by Canadian forces. By whatever name, more than 10,000 were built by the end of 1945 and at least 1,000 are still flying today worldwide.

This fabric circle measures 46 in diameter. It is a canvas type fabric with a thin metallic (such as thin aluminum foil) layer that is painted with a blue/white star inside a yellow circle. Truly a unique and colorful part of WW2 aviation history, this is an original piece, not a post war representation.

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